Welcome

This is a Web site to collect, save, and share information about the Michigan Terminal System (MTS), the computer time-sharing operating system, and the organizations and people that developed and ran it. The documents, images, recollections, and comments that make up this Web site come from many sources. It is our hope that individuals will contribute many more.

Overview: See the MTS Article on Wikipedia for a good overview of MTS, its architecture, and the sites that developed and ran it.

Software: See the MTS Distributions section of this Web site for information on the availability of MTS software and to download MTS Distributions.

E-Mail list: Announcements, news items, and updates related to MTS are sent to the e-mail group MTS-Interest@umich.edu a few times a year. If you would like to be added to the group, send a note to mts-comments@umich.edu.

Web Site: This web site was created by Jeff Ogden and is administered by Jeff, Gavin Eadie, and Mike Alexander. The "official" URL to use to reach this site is: http://archive.michigan-terminal-system.org.

Contribute: Anyone can view the contents of this archive, but only members of the Google Groups' group "# (Pound Sign)" can create and edit pages, upload documents and files, start discussions, and enter comments. To start, the group is only being used to control access to this archive site and not as an e-mail list. Anyone with a Google account may join this group. If you don't have a Google account, you can create one. They are free. If you just want to view items in the archive, you do not need to join. If you would like to contribute, click here to visit and join the group.

Questions: Send questions and comments to mts-comments@umich.edu.


News and updates


29 August 2019
An interesting article about the early history of Unix from Ars Technica

Today, Unix powers iOS and Android—its legend begins with a gator and a trio of researchers.
Richard Jensen - 8/29/2019, 8:00 AM


26 May 2019
Newcastle Computing: Celebrating 50 Years of Campus-wide Computing

From: Brian Randell
Subject: Inauguration of the new exhibition -- "Newcastle Computing: Celebrating 50 Years of Campus-wide Computing"
Date: May 22, 2019 at 9:08:23 AM EDT

Dear colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the event Newcastle Computing: Celebrating 50 Years of Campus-wide Computing taking place on the afternoon of Thursday 13th June 2019 in the Urban Sciences Building, Newcastle University.

We are unveiling a new exhibition on Newcastle’s acquisition of a System/360-67 machine and the development of the Michigan Terminal System. We will also have a series of talks on the history of computing at Newcastle, especially as it relates to these events.

For more information and to book, please visit: http://newcastlecomputing50.ncl.ac.uk. Attendance is free but registration is mandatory as we have space restrictions.

We look forward to seeing you at this event.

Best wishes

Brian Randell
School of Computing, Newcastle University

A PDF with background information is available as well.


26 May 2019
Newcastle University renames building to honor Elizabeth Barraclough

Elizabeth Barraclough Building, March 2019
Dear Colleagues,

As part of a series of building name changes, University Council endorsed a recommendation from University Executive Board to rename Black Horse House to The Elizabeth Barraclough Building. The Executive Board recommendation reads:

In October 2018 NUIT moved out of Claremont Tower/Bridge, its home since 1967, into the refurbished Black Horse House on Sandyford Road. Retaining the building name of a former Lloyds Bank call centre does not seem appropriate. It is both timely and fitting to name this building after the pioneer of computing services at Newcastle University, as well as its first head of department.

Elizabeth Barraclough was appointed as a computer operator in the University’s Computing Laboratory in 1957. Although this job title may conjure up images of relatively junior work, in 1950s this meant mathematics graduates working hands-on with some of the earliest commercially available mainframe computers in the world. Elizabeth’s early achievements included solving Friedholm integral equations and the computerisation of student registration and MSc timetabling, all before 1960. In 1967, Elizabeth was appointed Computer Manager for the Northumbrian Universities’ Multiple Access Computer and later the Executive Director of the University Computing Laboratory. In 1991 when the Computing Laboratory split into academic and service functions, Elizabeth became the first Director of the University Computing Service, one of the predecessors of the current IT Service, NUIT.

Upon retirement in 1993, Elizabeth was given the title Director Emeritus, Newcastle University Computing Service. In recognition of her 36 years of service, the University bestowed Elizabeth with an Honorary Fellowship in 2006.

Elizabeth will be visiting the building on 13th June @ 1100hrs to unveil a plaque, meet NUIT staff and tour our facilities. She will be joined by some other former members of the Computing Laboratory, including its first Director, Professor Ewan Page.

I hope a number of you will be able to meet Elizabeth during her visit.

Colleagues in ESS are working on changing external signage; the correct postal address is noted in my signature.

Best wishes,

Jason.
--
Jason N. Bain, Assistant Director Infrastructure,
University IT Service, Newcastle University, The Elizabeth Barraclough Building,
91 Sandyford Road, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8HW, United Kingdom.


21 March 2018 
Recent additions to Rupert Lane's "Try MTS" web site

Over the last six months or so, entries for PIL, APL, Assembler G, and GPSS have been added to the Programming languages in MTS section of the "Try MTS" web site. They join the existing entries for BASIC, FORTRAN, MAD (GOM), ALGOL 60, ALGOL W, LISP, UTILISP, PL/1(F), SNOBOL, RATFOR, and FLECS as well as more general information on MTS including how to install, operate, and use it.

 










To see older news and update items, go to the News and Updates archive section of this web site.